Documentation

Troubleshooting

Table of Contents

Looking at the Antrea logs

You can inspect the antrea-controller logs in the antrea-controller Pod by running this kubectl command:

kubectl logs -n kube-system <antrea-controller Pod name>

To check the logs of the antrea-agent, antrea-ovs, and antrea-ipsec containers in an antrea-agent Pod, run command:

kubectl logs -n kube-system <antrea-agent Pod name> -c [antrea-agent|antrea-ovs|antrea-ipsec]

To check the OVS daemon logs (e.g. if the antrea-ovs container logs indicate that one of the OVS daemons generated an error), you can use kubectl exec:

kubectl exec -n kube-system <antrea-agent Pod name> -c antrea-ovs tail /var/log/openvswitch/<DAEMON>.log

The antrea-controller Pod and the list of antrea-agent Pods, along with the Nodes on which the Pods are scheduled, can be returned by command:

kubectl get pods -n kube-system -l app=antrea -o wide

Logs of antrea-controller, antrea-agent, OVS and strongSwan daemons are also stored in the filesystem of the Node (i.e. the Node on which the antrea-controller or antrea-agent Pod is scheduled).

  • antrea-controller logs are stored in directory: /var/log/antrea (on the Node where the antrea-controller Pod is scheduled.
  • antrea-agent logs are stored in directory: /var/log/antrea (on the Node where the antrea-agent Pod is scheduled).
  • Logs of the OVS daemons - ovs-vswitchd, ovsdb-server, ovs-monitor-ipsec - are stored in directory: /var/log/antrea/openvswitch (on the Node where the antrea-agent Pod is scheduled).
  • strongSwan daemon logs are stored in directory: /var/log/antrea/strongswan (on the Node where the antrea-agent Pod is scheduled).

To increase the log level for the antrea-agent and the antrea-controller, you can edit the --v=0 arg in the Antrea manifest to a desired level. Alternatively, you can generate an Antrea manifest with increased log level of 4 (maximum debug level) using generate_manifest.sh: hack/generate-manifest.sh --mode dev --verbose-log

Accessing the antrea-controller API

antrea-controller runs as a Deployment, exposes its API via a Service and registers an APIService to aggregate into the Kubernetes API. To access the antrea-controller API, you need to know its address and have the credentials to access it. There are multiple ways in which you can access the API:

Using antctl

Typically, antctl handles locating the Kubernetes API server and authentication when it runs in an environment with kubeconfig set up. Same as kubectl, antctl looks for a file named config in the $HOME/.kube directory. You can specify other kubeconfig files by setting the --kubeconfig flag.

For example, you can view internal NetworkPolicy objects with this command:

antctl get networkpolicy

Using kubectl proxy

As the antrea-controller API is aggregated into the Kubernetes API, you can access it through the Kubernetes API using the appropriate URL paths. The following command runs kubectl in a mode where it acts as a reverse proxy for the Kubernetes API and handles authentication.

# Start the proxy in the background
kubectl proxy &
# Access the antrea-controller API path
curl 127.0.0.1:8001/apis/controlplane.antrea.tanzu.vmware.com

Using antctl proxy

Antctl supports running a reverse proxy (similar to the kubectl one) which enables access to the entire Antrea Controller API (not just aggregated API Services), but does not secure the TLS connection between the proxy and the Controller. Refer to the antctl documentation for more information.

Directly accessing the antrea-controller API

If you want to directly access the antrea-controller API, you need to get its address and pass an authentication token when accessing it, like this:

# Get the antrea service address
ANTREA_SVC=$(kubectl get service antrea -n kube-system -o jsonpath='{.spec.clusterIP}')
# Get the token value of antctl account, you can use any service accounts that have permissions to antrea API.
TOKEN=$(kubectl get secrets -n kube-system -o jsonpath="{.items[?(@.metadata.annotations['kubernetes\.io/service-account\.name']=='antctl')].data.token}"|base64 --decode)
# Access antrea API with TOKEN
curl --insecure --header "Authorization: Bearer $TOKEN" https://$ANTREA_SVC/apis

Accessing the antrea-agent API

antrea-agent runs as a DaemonSet Pod on each Node and exposes its API via a local endpoint. There are two ways you can access it:

Using antctl

To use antctl to access the antrea-agent API, you need to exec into the antrea-agent container first. antctl is embedded in the image so it can be used directly.

For example, you can view the internal NetworkPolicy objects for a specific agent with this command:

# Get into the antrea-agent container
kubectl exec -it <antrea-agent Pod name> -n kube-system -c antrea-agent bash
# View the agent's NetworkPolicy
antctl get networkpolicy

Using antctl proxy

Antctl supports running a reverse proxy (similar to the kubectl one) which enables access to the entire Antrea Agent API, but does not secure the TLS connection between the proxy and the Controller. Refer to the antctl documentation for more information.

Directly accessing the antrea-agent API

If you want to directly access the antrea-agent API, you need to log into the Node that the antrea-agent runs on or exec into the antrea-agent container. Then access the local endpoint directly using the Bearer Token stored in the file system:

TOKEN=$(cat /var/run/antrea/apiserver/loopback-client-token)
curl --insecure --header "Authorization: Bearer $TOKEN" https://127.0.0.1:10350/

Note that you can also access the antrea-agent API from outside the Node by using the authentication token of the antctl service account:

# Get the token value of antctl account.
TOKEN=$(kubectl get secrets -n kube-system -o jsonpath="{.items[?(@.metadata.annotations['kubernetes\.io/service-account\.name']=='antctl')].data.token}"|base64 --decode)
# Access antrea API with TOKEN
curl --insecure --header "Authorization: Bearer $TOKEN" https://<Node IP address>:10350/podinterfaces

However, in this case you will be limited to the endpoints that antctl is allowed to access, as defined here.

Troubleshooting Open vSwitch

OVS daemons (ovsdb-server and ovs-vswitchd) run inside the antrea-ovs container of the antrea-agent Pod. You can use kubectl exec to execute OVS command line tools (e.g. ovs-vsctl, ovs-ofctl, ovs-appctl) in the container, for example:

kubectl exec -n kube-system <antrea-agent Pod name> -c antrea-ovs ovs-vsctl show

By default the host directory /var/run/antrea/openvswitch/ is mounted to /var/run/openvswitch/ of the antrea-ovs container and is used as the parent directory of the OVS UNIX domain sockets and configuration database file. Therefore, you may execute some OVS command line tools (inc. ovs-vsctl and ovs-ofctl) from a Kubernetes Node - assuming they are installed on the Node - by specifying the socket file path explicitly, for example:

ovs-vsctl --db unix:/var/run/antrea/openvswitch/db.sock show
ovs-ofctl show unix:/var/run/antrea/openvswitch/br-int.mgmt

Commands to check basic OVS and OpenFlow information include:

  • ovs-vsctl show: dump OVS bridge and port configuration. Outputs of the command are like:
f06768ee-17ec-4abb-a971-b3b76abc8cda
    Bridge br-int
        datapath_type: system
        Port coredns--e526c8
            Interface coredns--e526c8
        Port antrea-tun0
            Interface antrea-tun0
                type: geneve
                options: {key=flow, remote_ip=flow}
        Port antrea-gw0
            Interface antrea-gw0
            type: internal
    ovs_version: "2.14.0"
  • ovs-ofctl show br-int: show OpenFlow information of the OVS bridge.
  • ovs-ofctl dump-flows br-int: dump OpenFlow entries of the OVS bridge.
  • ovs-ofctl dump-ports br-int: dump traffic statistics of the OVS ports.

For more information on the usage of the OVS CLI tools, check the Open vSwitch Manpages.

Troubleshooting with antctl

antctl provides some useful commands to troubleshoot Antrea Controller and Agent, which can print the runtime information of antrea-controller and antrea-agent, dump NetworkPolicy objects, dump Pod network interface information on a Node, dump Antrea OVS flows, and perform OVS packet tracing. Refer to the antctl guide to learn how to use these commands.

Profiling Antrea components

The easiest way to profile the Antrea components is to use the Go pprof tool. Both the Antrea Agent and the Antrea Controller use the K8s apiserver library to serve their API, and this library enables the pprof HTTP server by default. In order to access it without having to worry about authentication, you can use the antctl proxy function.

For example, this is what you would do to look at a 30-second CPU profile for the Antrea Controller:

# Start the proxy in the background
antctl proxy --controller&
# Look at a 30-second CPU profile
go tool pprof http://127.0.0.1:8001/debug/pprof/profile?seconds=30
Getting Started

To help you get started, see the documentation.